Now it’s Crystal Clear: Agate

Welcome to ‘Now it’s Crystal Clear’ series! This week’s topic is all about the Agate.

Found along the Achates River in Sicily, these beautifully banded stones were first given their name by the ancient philosopher Theophrastus. Its meaning differed from civilization to civilization — ancient Islamic cultures and Babylonians believed that agate could ward off the evil eye, tragedies and dispel evil energy. However, the ancient Egyptians and the Persians believed the agate was protection against natural disasters like lightning and other aspects. To the ancient Chinese, the power of the agate was more internal. They believed that the crystal meaning was one of spiritual protection, and could stimulate one’s life force while cleansing their mind to make space for good luck and fortune. By the Medieval times, the belief surrounding agate properties was that it could deliver a plentiful harvest if tied to the horns of an oxen …

Agates are banded types of chalcedony that come in a range of colors including pink, red, brown, white, purple, black, gray and yellow. This palette array comes from the impurities within the groundwater’s composition. Its colorful trademark bands are layers of agate deposits that develop on top of each other — with igneous rock joining the silica deposits in groundwater.  [**]

These stones are known to promote inner stability, composure, and maturity. Its warm, protective properties encourage security and self-confidence! [***]

IMG_2325.JPG
Building up quite a gemstone and crystal collection in my apartment — this Agate is one of my favorite pieces that I own! This picture does not do this stone justice — it’s gray, white and navy hues are absolutely stunning! – photo taken by me

If you thought the list of Jasper stones from Minerals.net was extensive — check out how many varieties of Agate there are!

Agate Geode – Thick layer of Agate surrounding a cavity in a geode that is usually lined with a layer of small Quartz crystals.
Agate Jasper – Opaque multicolored Jasper, or Jasper with banding; may also refer to a single stone with a combination of both Agate and Jasper.
Agatized Wood – Petrified Wood in the form of Agate, with banding patterns.
Agua Nueva Agate – Agate from the Mexican locality of Agua Nueva. Agua Nueva Agate is known for its purple and pink banding formations.
Blue Lace Agate – Agate with light blue bands in a lacy or wavy pattern.
Botswana Agate – Agate from the African country of Botswana banded with fine parallel lines of white, purple, or peach.
Brecciated Agate – Agate with broken fragments naturally cemented together; appears similar to breccia.
Cloud Agate – Grayish Agate with blurry, foggy patches of inclusions.
Condor Agate – Agate from San Rafael, Argentina, often with bright colors.
Coyamito Agate – Agate from Rancho Coyamito, Mexico, that often has reddish banding.
Crazy Lace Agate – Agate with twisting and turning bands of various colors.
Dendritic Agate – Translucent Chalcedony with tree-like or fern-like inclusions. Dendritic Agate is technically not a true Agate, as it lacks the banding patterns exhibited in Agates.
Dryhead Agate – Agate from Montana with orange and brownish banding.
Enhydro Agate – Agate nodule containing trapped water bubbles. The water can be seen from the outside of the nodule when held up to the light. Also known as Enhydritic Agate.
Eye Agate – Agate with banded, concentric rings that are perfectly rounded.
Fairburn Agate – Form of Fortification Agate from Fairburn, South Dakota.
Fire Agate – Form of Agate or Chalcedony that is iridescent with a play of colors or “fire” similar to that of Opal. Fire Agates usually have botryoidal bubbles included in their interior. The play of color is caused by inclusions of Goethite or Limonite.
Fortification Agate – Agate with a pattern in which all bands connect to each other causing it to resemble a medieval fortress (i.e. imaginary moat and walls surrounding the castle).
Fossil Agate – Agate that forms as a replacement of organic material such as wood and shells.
Grape Agate – Spherules of Agate or Chalcedony clustered together in a botryoidal, grape-like habit.
Iris Agate – Rare iridescent Agate that exhibits spectral colors on a translucent colorless or white base.

4a911dfc8a3592f88628d6ee07fbd2e7-1.jpg

Laguna Agate – Well known form of colorful Agate with very dense banding from Ojo Laguna, Chihuahua, Mexico.
Lake Superior Agate – Agate from the basalt region of northern Michigan, near the shores of Lake Superior.
Landscape Agate – Agate that resembles a scenic landscape such as mountain formations.
Mexican Lace Agate – Agate consisting of thin bands in a lacy or wavy pattern.
Moctezuma Agate – Agate from Estacion Moctezuma, Mexico, known for pastel colors.
Mojave Blue Agate – Agate with a light pastel blue or blue-gray color from the Mojave Desert in California.
Moss Agate – Chalcedony containing dense inclusions of green Hornblende that cause the pattern to resemble moss. Moss Agate is not true Agate as it lacks the banding patterns of Agate.
Nipomo Agate – Agate with Marcasite inclusions found in Nipomo, San Luis Obispo Co., California.
Onyx – Form of Chalcedony with a solid black color or white and black banding. Occasionally also refers to banded Travertine or Tufa in the mineral form of Calcite or Aragonite with black and white bands. For additional information, see the gemstone page on Onyx.
Oregon Snakeskin Agate – White to cream Agate or Chalcedony with a wrinkled or cracked “skin”, resembling the skin of a snake; found in Oregon.
Plume Agate – Agate with inclusions in feather-like patterns.
Queensland Agate – Distinct form of Agate from Agate Creek in Queensland, Australia. Rainbow Agate – Iridescent Agate that exhibits a multicolored effect thin slabs.
Sagenite Agate – Agate with acicular or or pointed inclusions of various minerals. These hair like formations are often arranged in fans or bursts.
Sardonyx – Form of Agate with parallel bands of brownish to red alternating with white or sometimes black bands.
Scenic Agate – Synonym of Landscape Agate
Snakeskin Agate – Agate with a scale-like layer that resembles the skin of a snake. Also refers to a reddish brown Agate with small black concentric bands.
Sweetwater Agate – Agate with star-shaped patterns of manganese oxide inclusions, found in the Sweetwater River, Wyoming. Sweetwater Agate is not true Agate as it lacks the banding patterns of Agate, but is a form of Moss Agate.
Thunder Egg – Rounded nodule filled with Agate in the center. The term Thunder Egg is usually reserved for such nodules found in Oregon, but the term may also encompass similar nodules from other locations.
Tube Agate – Agate with tube-like formations which are sometimes hollow.

** = https://www.energymuse.com/agate-meaning

*** = https://www.crystalvaults.com/crystal-encyclopedia/agate

[All photos and information are linked/credited to the original authors and sources unless otherwise stated].

A Healing Home: Crystal Decor

Ever since I’ve started to get into gemstones and crystals — it has become such a fixture in my home.

IMG_2441
So far I have Pyrite – which is said to act as a shield of protection, while bringing in/inviting prosperity, success and wealth – , Calcite, Blue Agate – which is said to increase concentration, honesty and memory – , and Crystal Quartz Geode in various areas of my home! – photo taken by me

It’s said that different gemstones and crystals give off certain energies and healing properties. They can range from protection, calmness, self-esteem/confidence boost, wisdom, balance and groundedness — just to name a few.

With all of these different types of stones and properties — it’s hard to know which to add to your home. Now, it’s strictly up to you for which stones call out to you and feel the best / have the right fit! However, for those – like me – who can’t decide — here’s a few suggestions on which gemstones and crystals to add to your home and various living spaces! [*]

The Best for your Desk and Workspace – Amethyst

I’m definitely going to bring a chunk of one to the office for my desk! This stone is a natural stress reliever — it encourages inner strength, peace, spiritual growth and intuition. [**] I also suggest having one (or a cluster) of these in your workspace at home as well!

The Best for your Bedroom – Rose quartz

Known as the stone of love, its gentle qualities are said to open your heart to all types of love. Whether it be self-love, romantic, family and for everything else — the bedroom is the best place to surround yourself with love. [**] Since it’s not necessarily a very neutral color, placing this pink stone in your room can be in areas where it’s hidden or to bring a bit of color to your decor — whether it be in a bowl with other stones, a candle holder, book-ends — the possibilities are endless!

The Best for your Kitchen / Dining room – Calcite

Does it still count as being in my kitchen if I placed this stone in my living room which is right next to my kitchen? I’m going to say yes — especially since I only have so much space in my 700+ sq ft apartment. Calcite radiates calm and soothing energy. It helps restore balance to the mind, body and spirit! [**] The kitchen is a great space for this crystal because it’s where we keep ourselves and our loved ones nourished, as well as being a busy and frequent gathering area. Calcite comes in a variety of colors, so you’re able to still get its properties while choosing whichever fits your color palette best!

The Best for your Living room / Family  room – Selenite

5d42aa85f5c605537acef9d14cb1fa19.jpg

Selenite is ideal for energy cleansing. It’s said to unblock stagnant and remove negative energy. Bringing peace and mental clarity, this is a great crystal for this space because it’s where we gather to be with our loved ones and or an area to rest/relax after a long day. [**]

The Best for your Bathroom – Clear Quartz

Clear Quartz amplifies energy and enhances clarity of the mind. [**] It’s a good crystal to have in this space because it’s an area we are with our thoughts and have time to ourselves — whether it’s taking care of business or relaxing with a hot shower or warm bath.

I can’t wait to add some of these new crystals to my home ASAP! Are any of these in your home? How are you experiencing + enjoying them? Let me know!

xo. Britt

* = https://www.wellandgood.com/good-advice/crystals-for-every-room-guide/

** = http://thechalkboardmag.com/ultimate-guide-how-to-use-healing-crystals

[All photos and information are linked/credited to the original authors and sources unless otherwise stated].

Now it’s Crystal Clear: Jasper

Welcome to ‘Now it’s Crystal Clear’ series! This week’s topic is all about Jasper.jaspermeaning-jasperproperties.jpgThe Jasper stone has been around for centuries. Worn by shamans, priests and kings, it was considered sacred and a powerful protection stone — for both the physical world and in the spiritual realm. Amulets of Jasper were carved by the Egyptians with symbols and inscriptions from the Book of the Dead and buried with mummified remains for safe passage in the after life. It was highly utilized in many cultures for engraving cylinder seals, signet rings, and special talismans depicting astrological and religious images …

Known as the “Supreme Nurturer,” Jasper is a stone of grounding and stability, providing comfort and security, strength and healing. Its presence balances the aura to a level of wholeness and peace, and acts as a reminder that one is not here on the physical plane simply for oneself, but to bring joy and substance to others. [Click here for more details]

IMG_2258.JPG
This Picture Jasper piece is a recent purchase I made at a local Arts & Crafts fair. My Mom and I both walked over to this artist’s booth and looked at this same piece without realizing it! Funny how some stones call out to you. This variety of Jasper is described as being the Earth Mother speaking to her children. It forms in remarkable bands and flow patterns of browns, black, tan, blue and ivory, and exhibits a hidden message or “picture” from the past (this particular piece reminds me of an abstract work of art more so than a picture) … An excellent stone for creative vision, initiative and boosting confidence, it is an ideal aid for starting one’s own business.  [***]  How cool! – photo taken by me
It’s insane how many varieties of this stone there are! This list from Minerals.net was the most comprehensive that I could find:

Agate Jasper –  Opaque multicolored Jasper, or Jasper with banding; may also refer to a single stone with a combination of both Agate and Jasper.
Basanite  –  Incorrectly refers to a black, fine-grained variety of Jasper. The proper definition of Basanite is a low-grade Obsidian.
Biggs Jasper –  Jasper from Biggs Junction, Oregon, with varying light and dark color brown bands and pretty formations.
Brecciated Jasper  –  Jasper in rounded fragments naturally cemented together in a gray material; appears similar to breccia.
Bruneau Jasper  –  Jasper from Bruneau Canyon, in Owyhee County, Idaho, with distinctive brown, cream, (and sometimes even red or green) banding and patterns.
Cave Creek Jasper  –  Reddish Jasper found near Cave Creek in Maricopa County, Arizona.
Dalmatian Jasper – pale gray, cream or beige-brown with dark spots and resembles the coat of a Dalmatian.
Deschutes Jasper  –  Jasper from a deposit slightly east of Biggs Junction, Oregon, near the Deschutes River, with good banding and interesting color formations.
Egyptian Jasper –  Form of Orbicular Jasper with white and gray circles on a red background. It is found as rounded pebbles on the beaches of Egypt. A similar Jasper is found on the beaches of Washington state and sometimes also labelled as Egyptian Jasper.
Green Jasper  –  Jasper with a light to dark green color. Green Jasper differs from Prase and Plasma since it is fully opaque.
Kinradite  –  May be used as a synonym for Jasper, but more often refers to Orbicular Jasper with concentric rings of colorless or white Quartz.
Leopard Jasper  –  Leopard Jasper is a form of Orbicular Jasper with tan color rings, appearing similar to the spots of a leopard.
Morgan Hill Jasper –  Jasper found in Morgan Hill, California, with small reddish and yellow “poppy” formations. Sometimes synonymous with “Poppy Jasper”.
Morrisonite  –  Multicolored Jasper from the Owyhee River gorge in Malheur Co., Oregon.
2175e3c1f0588b3496001299353bb151-2
Moss Jasper –  Form of Jasper or Chalcedony containing dense inclusions of green Hornblende that cause the pattern to resemble moss. Often used as a synonym for Moss Agate.
Ocean Jasper  –  Ocean Jasper is a form of Orbicular Jasper found on the coast of Madagascar with small, tight, concentric ring formations.
Opal Jasper  –  Opal Jasper is a form of Brecciated Jasper in which the cementing material is Opal.
Orbicular Jasper  –  Jasper with rounded concentric rings throughout.
Owyhee Jasper  –  Form of Jasper with scenic picture formations found near the Owyhee River in Oregon.
Picture Jasper –  Form of Jasper with scenic picture-like formations.
Poppy Jasper  –  Poppy Jasper is a form of yellow Orbicular Jasper with red concentric rings.
Riband Jasper  –  Jasper with banded stripes, usually dark red, brown, yellow, or white bands.
Ribbon Jasper  –  Jasper in the form of Banded Jasper with think banded lines.
Rogueite –  Green form of Jasper from the Rogue River in Oregon.
Russian Jasper  –  Jasper from Russia, usually with reddish spots.
Stone Canyon Jasper  –  Yellowish type of Jasper in the form of Brecciated Jasper from Stone Canyon (near San Miguel), California.
Wascoite –  Jasper from Wasco Co., Oregon, with irregular yellow, pink, and red concentric bands.
Zebra Jasper  –  Dark brown Jasper with lighter brown to white colored banding streaks.
[All photos and information are linked/credited to the original authors and sources unless otherwise stated].

Hello!

Welcome to flaxccentuate!

 

Ever since I can remember, I’ve always been a collector. It was always a mixture of rocks I’d found on the street or in front of a neighbor’s yard, as well as shells and sea glass along the shoreline. I’d never really had a purpose for them, I just knew I liked the way they looked and it was always something fun to find and bring home.

As I got older, I started to immerse myself in fashion and accessories — statement necklaces being my accessory of choice. I had big dreams of graduating and jet setting off to New York to work in the industry. However, college flew by and I diverted on to a completely different path. Being that it’s so different, I had felt that I was losing my sense of creativity.  I was always trying to be very involved, have a social life and do well in my courses + my internship. I didn’t have the time I once did to write, read for fun, or create art. Once I graduated and started working full-time, this became very prevalent and it was all I could think about. So, I started researching and found a set of hobbies that would soon change my life — Metalsmithing and Beading!

As I’m learning all about these art forms and this industry — I’ve decided to create an outlet to showcase my work [which a few of my pieces can be seen above], life happenings, my findings and to geek out about crystals/gems/stones + more!

Speaking of geeking out … every other week I will feature my ‘Now it’s Crystal Clear’ series to showcase different crystals/gems/stones and all you could ever hope to know + learn about them!

I’m so excited to start this journey and bring together my love for accessories and nature’s beauty!

Thanks for joining me on this rockin’ adventure — you’re such a gem! 😉

xo. Britt